Strategic Plan

Strategic Plan 2016-2021

 

Mission

The American Society of Pediatric Nephrology is an organization of pediatric nephrologists and affiliated health care professionals. Our primary goals are to promote optimal care for children with kidney disease through advocacy, education and research; and to disseminate advances in clinical practice and scientific investigation.

Goals
  1. Advance optimal care for children with kidney disease
  2. Enhance member and public awareness of ASPN activities
  3. Ensure a robust pediatric nephrology workforce
  4. Enrich the value of membership in ASPN to all its members
  5. Create and maintain a robust, stable infrastructure that will allow us to accomplish our mission
Strategies

1.1 Maximize effective partnerships with other professional organizations

1.2 Educate external agencies about the needs of children and pediatric nephrologists

1.3 Promote research focused on pediatric kidney disease

1.4 Support development and dissemination of clinical practice guidelines

 

2.1 Develop communication plan aimed at internal stakeholders

2.2 Increase transparency of internal processes to the Society membership

2.3 Leverage existing, and develop new, communication platforms

 

3.1 Monitor and anticipate workforce needs

3.2 Increase resident/student interest in pediatric nephrology as a career

3.3 Improve professional satisfaction and decrease attrition of pediatric nephrologists

3.4 Involve and integrate affiliate members in workforce development, expansion and retention

 

4.1 Increase opportunities for, and encourage member engagement in, ASPN

4.2 Maximize opportunities and support for professional networking and leadership

4.3 Support the ability of ASPN members to perform clinical activities effectively

4.4 Provide access to effective educational resources and certification based on career stage

4.5 Promote the ability of members to participate in and conduct research

 

5.1 Ensure financial sustainability

5.2 Support and expand the ASPN Foundation as the mechanism for philanthropic opportunities

5.3 Maximize partnerships with patients and patient advocacy groups, other non-profits

5.4 Clarify and optimize the relationship with the CLB

5.5 Strengthen central office operations

5.6 Enhance technology capabilities to meet current and future needs

Tubuloreticular inclusions in SLE nephritis

Tubuloreticular inclusions in a patient with diffuse proliferative SLE nephritis (SLE class IV). These subcellular structures (dark circular clusters) on transmission electron microscopy are localized to the cytoplasm of endothelial cells, and thought to be formed in high interferon states. These are classic for SLE nephritis, but can be seen in other glomerular conditions as well including membranous nephropathy, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and infection-associated glomerulonephritis.

Eunice G. John (2019)

 

It is with profound sadness that we announce the passing of our colleague and friend, Dr. Eunice John. Dr. John retired as Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine after serving UIC residents and patients for 42 years.

Dr. John, who was chief of pediatric nephrology and medical director of pediatric transplant at UI Health, was a revered leader in kidney transplant innovations and outcomes. She was the first Chicago physician to start long-term peritoneal dialysis and to use the double lumen catheter of hemodialysis in children in the early 1980s. In 2002, Dr. John performed the first pediatric living-donor bowel transplant in partnership with Dr. Enrico Benedetti, the Warren H. Cole Chair of Surgery. The patient, who is now in his 20s, is the longest living recipient of this type of surgery.

Dr. John was a graduate of Christian Medical College in Vellore, India. She completed a residency at Tulane University and a fellowship in pediatric nephrology at the Yeshiva University, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She was a member of the U.S. Army Reserve for 16 years.

She had an impressive record of scholarly activity, with more than 100 publications on her CV. She obtained such funding as CkID and NIH grants, and she was sought after throughout the world as an invited speaker. But she would want the emphasis to be on the ways that she furthered her area of study by helping others to succeed. Dr. John created a lasting impact through her tireless work with patients and young physicians. She was deeply committed to community service, spearheading a wide range of programs for children and families both local and abroad. As a testament to her excellence, she received 15 teaching and mentoring awards, more than 15 service awards, and 5 patient care awards from UI Health.

Dr. John had a compassionate approach to all aspects of her profession, and she was a remarkably generous person. She was devoted to her family members, particularly her late sister (Iris P. Samuel) and her children (Smitha and Suneeth Samuel). Arrangements have been made with Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home at 6150 North Cicero Avenue in Chicago: funeral service on Saturday, June 8, at 11 am; and visitation on Friday, June 7, from 3 to 8 pm. Internment will be in the Bohemian National Cemetery. For the obituary and details, please visit the Smith-Corcoran website. The Department of Pediatrics will have a memorial grand rounds in Dr. John’s honor on September 20, 2019.

It was an incredible privilege to work alongside Dr. John. She will be forever remembered as an extraordinary clinician, educator, leader, and human being with unparalleled devotion and kindness.

Benjamin W. Van Voorhees, MD,
MPH Professor and Head, Department of Pediatrics