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  • John Herrin (2020)

    It is with great sadness that we announce the passing on October 25, 2020 of John T. Herrin, MBBS, FRACP, 84, former Director of Clinical Services within the Division of Nephrology at Boston Children’s Hospital. After his initial medical training, John left his native Australia and moved to Boston. He spent much of his early career at the Massachusetts General Hospital, where he was chief of Pediatric Nephrology from 1974 to 1994. He then moved to Boston Children’s Hospital in 1994, where he remained a cherished member of the Division of Nephrology until he retired in 2014. John held an appointment at Harvard Medical School for 49 years. John was a passionate medical educator and developed a preceptor practice program to enhance how hundreds of pediatric residents and dozens of nephrology fellows learned clinical nephrology. He welcomed physicians, nurses, and students from around the world to Boston to spend time observing pediatric nephrology practice and care.  He had near total recall of the medical literature and was a walking encyclopedia of clinical pearls that he delighted in sharing. John was also the consummate clinician, totally committed to his patients and their well-being. There were no constraints to the length of a clinic visit or the duration of in-patient rounds if there were questions to be answered or concerns to be assuaged. In all his interactions, he modeled rare equanimity and unfailing generosity. For those who worked alongside John, his extraordinary skills as a physician, his careful guidance as a teacher and mentor, and his unparalleled kindness as a colleague will always be remembered. He will be sorely missed. Members of the Division of Nephrology, Boston Children’s Hospital Dr. John T. Herrin's Obituary
  • Mesangial Deposits

    Electron microscopy of a biopsy specimen in a patient with IgA nephropathy. Electron dense deposits can be identified in the mesangium (black arrows), which on immunofluorescence would have predominant or co-dominant IgA staining. Note that although mesangial IgA deposits are classic in IgA nephropathy and IgA vasculitis (former Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis), they can be seen in other conditions including infection-associated glomerulonephritis, inflammatory bowel disease, malignancies, sarcoidosis, and certain dermatologic conditions. GBM; glomerular basement membrane. RBC; red blood cells. Mes; mesangium. CS; capillary space. Images courtesy of Patrick Walker, MD.
  • Perihilar FSGS

    Perihilar variant of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). Hyaline deposition and sclerosis occur at the vascular pole of the glomerulus. This variant is believed to be a secondary form of FSGS, occurring as an adaptive response to other injuries resulting in loss of functioning nephrons, such as in obesity-related kidney disease. Images courtesy of Patrick Walker, MD.